Palliative Care

Prepare for the end of life, with grace, comfort and skill.

Face the reality of death head on

Face the reality of death head on

by SHIRLEY ROBERTS
Contributor

“It is always a shock when someone dies,” as Shirley Roberts writes in her great book, Doris Inc. “None of us is ever truly ready to lose our parents or our spouse.”

But we can make the end of life for our loved one with dementia as peaceful, comfortable and graceful as possible.

As Roberts points out: Face the reality of death head on. Accept inevitability of physical decline and dying, and the reality that we can’t control when our loved ones and we will die.

Here is Roberts’ guide for creating a comfortable home, building a palliative-care team, and providing the emotional, psychological and physical comfort your loved one will need.

The critical thing to remember: “Most people will not lose their emotions, sense of touch or hearing until the last moments of life.”

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Doris Inc.: A Business Approach to Caring for Your Elderly Parents

Proven strategies for finding balance in your life and career while maximizing the quality of life for an elderly person. Using her business prowess, author Shirley Roberts, with the help of her financial advisor brother, developed Doris Inc., a system to maintain their lives and careers while ensuring that their mother received top-notch care.  


About the author

Shirley Roberts

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